Stelarc and Sellars – Virtual Futures Salon at the Victoria and Albert Museum 

Alternative Anatomies with Stelarc and Nina SellarsVirtual Futures at the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Digital Design Weekend.

A momentous day in the technobiosphere of digital design / cyborg / post human / cultural studies / art history.

Guest speakers Nina Sellars from Symbiotica and #VF original Stelarc connected through a shared interest in anatomy. Sellars, looks at bio-material and has re-claimed fat as an organ with greater stem cell yield than bone marrow.

Stelarc experiments on his own body and is cultivating an internet enabled, stem cell grown 3rd ear on his forearm. The combined artist/scientif/ic practice is a groundbreaking collaboration that challenges anatomical boundaries, opening up further potential for unexpected possibilities for the human condition.

Real mind blowing, body popping stuff!!! #postART+SCIENCE artistic practice.

Virtual Futures stems from The Cybernetic Culture Research Unit (Ccru) a student-run interdisciplinary collective founded in 1995 out of the University of Warwick’s philosophy department. It was associated with the work of Sadie Plant, Nick Land, Dan O’Hara and many other rhizomatically linked associates.

To find out more about this field visit www.virtualfutures.co.uk

‪’Keep your two eyes on what your three hands are doing’ Stelarc

Virtual Futures Salon held at the V&A as part of their #digitaldesign weekend.

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About artbyjaxx

Contemporary British artist, Jacqueline Hammond, is renowned for producing strong, punchy images that are rich in texture and colour. A prolific painter and multidisciplinary artist, she exhibits widely and is commissioned by individual clients, collectors and high profile brands. Jacqueline’s inspiration comes from direct observation: subject matter is plucked from the world encountered every day. Some ideas evolve, others are reactionary. Thought-provoking themes explore today’s society, the media and cultural theory. Whether inspired by the street or the sea, Jacqueline’s work has an edge: her paintings are consistently striking. Her natural disposition is to let the paint dictate the creative process, trusting the medium and her mind’s eye to translate the vision.
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