Portraits of the Queen Exhibition

I was invited to exhibit my painting of ‘The Queen in a Moment of Privacy’ in a Portraits of the Queen exhibition at West Ox Arts Gallery, Bampton, Oxfordshire which runs throughout June 2012 (www.westoxarts.com)

Here are some responses to the piece:

Erin Singleton curator at West Ox Arts Gallery,

“We’ve had a couple of surprise visitors in the Gallery today which means they got a bit of a sneak peak of our Portraits of the Queen exhibition which is due to open to the public tomorrow. There’s one piece in the show that has resulted in an audible “Oh I don’t like that” from two people today and no doubt that sentiment will be announced several more times through the course of the exhibition. Rather than try to put words in the artist’s mouth, we thought we’d let her do the talking. Here’s a link to her conversation with BBC Radio Sussex – have a listen:”

http://soundcloud.com/jaxx-hammond/radio-sussex-interview-queens

“Art that brings forth no reaction is really no more than wallpaper, I’m glad the exhibition will feature a spectrum of work, Jacqueline is a known artist and I’m certain a little controversy is a good thing, this is not Windsor Castle.” Martin Beek (West Ox Arts)

Portraits of the Queen – West Ox Arts Gallery:

“In celebration of the Diamond Jubilee, West Ox Arts Gallery is inviting artists from far and wide to submit a portrait of the Queen for exhibition, to be on display throughout the month of June, with prizes to be awarded by public vote in the following categories: Most Creative, Most Ambitious & Most Realistic.”

Opening Reception (voting begins): Sat 2 June, 2-4pm Awards Reception (winners announced): Tues 5 June, 11-1.30pm. Jacqueline Hammond’s painting ‘Queen in a Moment of Privacy’ will be open to offers until 30th June.

‘The Queen in a Moment of Privacy’ Jacqueline Hammond
Acrylics on canvas. 76.5 x 51 cm (Gilded finish frame)
Released to commemorate The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee in 2012. The original painting is for sale and open to offers from collectors.
Ending 3pm Saturday 30th June 2012.

Queenie Nose She Picked a Diamond Year Limited Edition Print of 200
THIS IS A LIMITED EDITION GICLEÉ PRINT. A CHANCE TO PURCHASE A COLLECTIBLE PRINT FROM AN EDITION OF 200. RELEASED TO COMMEMORATE THE QUEEN’S DIAMOND JUBILEE YEAR. HAND SIGNED AND NUMBERED BY BRITISH ARTIST, JACQUELINE HAMMOND.

Some Notes to consider when viewing The Queen Portrait ‘She Picked a Diamond Year’

  • It’s not that crude or anarchic – affectionately distasteful
  • I’m not picking on the monarchy / the queen
  • She’s only picking her nose – or is someone else – it’s actually my hand
  • Not putting my fingers up / ‘giving her the finger’ in a Sex Pistols way (would have used a different one!)
  • There are worse things people do in private
  • Not against the Diamond Jubilee celebrations, although the expense of it all…
  • Alternative rather than anti commemorative
  • I’m just here to lower the tone!
  • Poking fun at the pomp of it all
  • Theme (Seeking Picasso – 2007) ‘Private’ Lives
  • Iconic, postage stamp portrait (head and shoulders – traditional)
  • It’s as if she is posing for a portrait – has to have a rummage, sitting, caught in the act
  • Or about to face her public / ceremony
  • Her face – disgust, resistant, indifferent TOO
  • The symbolism of the MIRROR – the image she reflects – mirroring public opinion towards the Queen / monarchy
  • A painting that has several CONNOTATIONS – SEVERAL INTERPRETATIONS / VIEWS
  • Art is subjective to the viewer / people to decide what it’s saying
  • In the past would’ve offended people – I’d be hung!
  • Scottish editor – picking on an 80 year old lady
  • Who can’t defend herself – an ironic thing to say considering who she is!
  • If she saw it, I think she’d laugh too
  • Don’t take it seriously – make your own bunting / hats and have a street party or if you feel strongly – do something

POLITICAL / HUMANISING / ANTI-ESTABLISHMENT – Standpoints

The more political / anti-monarchy stance is as follows:

  • Outdated institution
  • Antiquated power from the top down
  • PROTEST MOVEMENT
  • Power from the bottom up – republic / democracy
  • Waste of tax payers’ money
  • Represent the ‘establishment’
  • Not representative of modern Britain
  • Have given parliament / politicians / government ‘free reign’ therefore don’t represent the ‘people’s best interest’
  • Lords, ladies – ‘high society’
  • Haves – upper class ‘Diamond Jubilee’
  • Have nots – lower – diamond year (geezer!)
  • Resentful – pick on the monarchy – “why should they have all that when we can’t…”
  • Not the ‘Best of British’ times right now
  • Bring the nation together, ‘on side’ to get us through the hard times

People’s reactions / question their own viewpoint:

  • Makes people (on all levels) laugh, snigger, appeals to (all sorts) of British humour
  • A bit naughty – affectionately distasteful – even to Royalists
  • “The Queen wouldn’t / doesn’t do that / does she?”
  • She probably does – we all do it
  • Humanises – just like the rest of us ‘only human’
  • People don’t put the monarchy on a pedestal so much now – ambivalent
  • Being royal doesn’t impress the public anymore
  • Win back affection – the media – public support – by making them appear to be ‘normal’
  • Surprise rather than shock
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About artbyjaxx

Contemporary British artist, Jacqueline Hammond, is renowned for producing strong, punchy images that are rich in texture and colour. A prolific painter and multidisciplinary artist, she exhibits widely and is commissioned by individual clients, collectors and high profile brands. Jacqueline’s inspiration comes from direct observation: subject matter is plucked from the world encountered every day. Some ideas evolve, others are reactionary. Thought-provoking themes explore today’s society, the media and cultural theory. Whether inspired by the street or the sea, Jacqueline’s work has an edge: her paintings are consistently striking. Her natural disposition is to let the paint dictate the creative process, trusting the medium and her mind’s eye to translate the vision.
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